Manchester Attack: Police Arrest 3 More Suspects

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In deploying British troops, prime minister Theresa May said she did not wish to "unduly alarm" citizens but that investigations "revealed it is a possibility we can not ignore that there is a wider group of individuals linked to this incident".

Greater Manchester Police say Abedi - a British national whose father, Ramadan, comes from Libya - was part of a wider terror network.

Britain prepared to deploy soldiers at key sites on Wednesday, having raised its terror threat level to maximum after a suicide bomber massacred 22 people at a pop concert in Manchester.

British police and intelligence agencies worked Wednesday to piece together the allegiances of the Manchester suicide bomber and foil any new potential threats, as the country's law-and-order chief said it's "likely" he did not act alone. In an interview with the AP before his arrest, Ramadan said his 23-year-old son, Ismail, had been arrested Tuesday, as well.

"Clearly this was a pretty sophisticated and powerful bomb", a high-ranking Western government official told NPR, explaining that officers believe Abedi received help in the attack. The government said almost 1,000 soldiers were deployed Wednesday in high-profile sites in London and elsewhere, replacing police, who can work on counter-terrorism duties.

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Instead the Dutch side was fenced in by United, nullified by Marouane Fellaini and man of the match Ander Herrera in the middle. Mourinho said, "It's so unfair what happened to him but life and football sometimes are".

The vigil drew representatives of different religions who, one by one, condemned Monday evening's bombing, which ripped through a crowd leaving a show by USA singer Ariana Grande.

The Abedi family, however, is close to the family of al-Qaida veteran Abu Anas al-Libi, who was snatched by US special forces off a Tripoli street in 2013, then died in USA custody in 2015.

Suicide bomber Salaam Abedi, 22, shocked the world when he set off a massive explosion, killing 22 and maiming scores of others.

Speaking Wednesday from the Libyan city of Tripoli, Abedi's father denied that his son was linked to militants or to the deadly attack.

Intelligence experts believe the device detonated at a concert by the pop singer Ariana Grande at the Manchester Arena on Monday night was so sophisticated that Abedi must have either been given specialist training overseas or used a bomb made by a technician who has not yet been captured.

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A Libyan neighbor says the elder Abedi returned again to Libya in 2011 after Gadhafi's government fell. She also visited the police headquarters and a children's hospital in Manchester. London Mayor Sadiq Khan said more police had been ordered onto the streets of the British capital.

British security services are under scrutiny after leaked reports claimed Abedi's parents had alerted authorities to his radicalisation in Manchester, persuading him to come to Libya and confiscating his passport until he claimed he wanted to go on a pilgrimage to Mecca.

The first time the threat level was raised to critical was in 2006 during a major operation to stop a plot to blow up transatlantic airliners with liquid bombs.

Speaking to The Telegraph in 2016, former head of the National Counter Terrorism Security Office Chris Phillips said he did not "believe the United Kingdom knows how many people have left for Syria or indeed come back".

Islamic State was one of several jihadist groups which grew in power and influence in Libya after a much-criticised military intervention led by former U.S. President Barack Obama and former British Prime Minister David Cameron.

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North Korea a week earlier successfully tested a new midrange missile - the Hwasong 12 - that it said could carry a heavy nuclear warhead.

"They deserve it", she said.

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