Trump suggests Republicans use "nuclear option" to pass laws

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More than 140 House Republicans signed a letter Wednesday calling for GOP leaders to scale back those defense cuts as part of the upcoming long-term budget talks.

If the GOP bill became law, congressional analysts estimate that 24 million more Americans would be uninsured by 2026, including 14 million by next year.

"After years of partisan bickering and gridlock, this bill is a clear win for the American people", Trump himself said later on Tuesday at a White House event.

Mr. Trump complained in a pair of tweets about the government spending deal that the Republican majority had to negotiate with Democrats because of the 60-vote hurdle in the Senate to advance the measure. "What we wanted is what we got: a good, balanced bipartisan negotiation where the Senate Republicans and Democrats work together to keep the government functioning".

But the top Republican in the House of Representatives, Speaker Paul Ryan, painted the accord differently, saying that his party's negotiators had been successful in ending an Obama-era requirement that an increase in military spending had to be matched equally with a boost in domestic funding. Because it's what they told their base they would deliver, and they failed to do that for their base. John McCain, Arizona Republican, who voted for the legislation. Republicans control both chambers, and they want to avoid a government shutdown.

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In fact, the bill lets states opt out of requiring insurers not to discriminate. That's a major problem for moderate Republicans, but the announcement of a vote signaled that leadership believes the measure will pass.

The House voted Wednesday to approve a roughly $1.1trillion spending bill that includes more than $15 billion in defense spending and $1.5 billion in money for US border security, setting up a vote later this week in the Senate ahead of a deadline to keep the government open past Friday.

Trump tweeted on Tuesday that the government "needs a good shutdown" in September to fix a "mess" in the Senate in his displeasure with Democrats prevailing on a temporary spending bill.

The agreement, which averted a government shutdown, did not include funding for Trump's proposed border wall.

Trump's 2018 budget proposal was never expected to pass both houses of Congress just as he wrote it. There will be no hulking edifice Trump promised on the campaign trail. That would claim a victory for President Donald Trump, six weeks after almost leaving it for dead and days after support from GOP moderates seemed to crumble anew.

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According to Politico, citing White House sources, Trump was angry that the media was portraying the deal as a win for Democrats.

Upton announced Tuesday that he could not support the Obamacare repeal effort if the replacement bill stripped Obamacare's pricing protections for individuals with pre-existing conditions.

The Democrats were also able to force other issues during the negotiations.

Republicans praised $15 billion in additional Pentagon spending obtained by Trump, as well as $1.5 billion in emergency spending for border security, though not for the wall he has vowed to build along the U.S. -Mexico border to deter illegal immigration, and the extension of a school voucher program in the District of Columbia. He also claimed credit for $6 billion in war funding approved by former President Obama as a Trump win.

At the same time, Congress is ready to give final approval to a bipartisan $1 trillion measure financing federal agencies through September.

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