British PM May tries to quell public anger after deadly London fire

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Residents and volunteers will attend a private session at No 10 on Saturday, it was reported, after intense criticism of May's approach in the aftermath of the blaze, which claimed at least 30 lives and injured dozens more.

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But the visits, which took place more than 48 hours after the fire broke out, have done little to quell the growing anger over the way Mrs May has dealt with the tragedy.

"It is criminal to wrap homes in flammable plastic", read another sign after it emerged that cladding installed on the exterior walls of the tower as part of refurbishment was officially graded as not fire-resistant.

Cundy added that the death toll could rise.

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'Our deep gratitude to the emergency services, who continue to respond swiftly.

On the figure of 58, he said: "I really hope it won't, but it may increase", while adding that "it might be that some of those are safe and well", and for some reason, had not yet made themselves known to the police. He asked anyone who was in the tower and survived to contact police immediately.

"The UK approach to safety seems to be about making a show", said Nicholas Lobo Brennan, of Apparata.

Police and firefighters have now reached the top of the tower in their search.

"The scale of this tragedy is clearly proving too much for the local authority to cope with on their own", Khan said in an open letter to Prime Minister Theresa May.

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The identification of the victims is proving very hard - which experts attribute to the extreme heat of the fire. They have have not been seen since the fire.

And chants of "not 17" were heard as residents demanded answers from the council on the real number of people who have died in the tower block. Earlier in the day, the 91-year-old monarch described the country's mood as "somber" but insisted that Britain remained resolute during a hard time.

In an interview with the BBC late Friday, Ms May insisted she was "deeply affected" by the "horrifying" stories of survivors, and repeated that she was determined to help. Hundreds have been left homeless, putting more pressure on officials in a city plagued by a chronic housing shortage.

The government is expected to discuss the establishment of a strike force to urgently identify fire-prone buildings at a meeting on Monday, The Daily Telegraph reported. The public is also demanding answers about how the blaze spread so quickly amid reports that the recently-renovated building's exterior paneling fueled the flames. British officials have ordered a review of other buildings that have had similar renovations. More than 3 million pounds ($3.8 million) have been raised for the victims. Churches and community centers are providing meals and support, and donations of clothing, toys and household supplies are flooding in. "I don't think I will ever forget them".

"The Brigade advised that a section of track be temporarily closed due to the short term risk of some debris from the tower falling onto the track", a London Fire Brigade spokeswoman said.

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