What Does Trump Gain By Attacking His Own Justice Department on Twitter?

Share

US President Donald Trump called Monday for a "much tougher version" of his travel ban and an "expedited" hearing for the measure before the Supreme Court. Trump defended his efforts to temporarily limit travel from six Muslim-majority countries by criticizing his "politically correct" Justice Department for having "watered down" what he definitively called his "travel ban".

On June 1, the U.S. Department of Justice asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn decisions by lower courts blocking the travel ban.

The tweets came just days after the Justice Department asked the Supreme Court to resolve the legality of the ban (in favor of the administration, of course) and allow the administration to enforce the ban while the appeal is being heard.

"Yes, we may incorporate @realDonaldTrump's tweets about the ban into our Supreme Court argument", the ACLU tweeted from its flagship account. Critics have assailed the ban as discriminatory and his reasoning for it as flawed.

When he issued the first version of his travel order, on January 27, one week after taking office, opponents called it a thinly disguised effort to enact that religious-based ban on travel.

Three policemen killed in Jakarta twin blasts
Vice National Police Chief Syafruddin said an initial investigation showed there were two explosions and a suspected suicide bomber had also died.

Both judges asserted that the executive order amounted to religious discrimination against Muslims.

"Ironically, it makes more hard the very thing that Trump was demanding: the reinstatement of his immigration order", Turley said.

The contradictory messages - one critical and misleading, the other diplomatic and resolute - are only the latest example of how government officials keep having to play clean-up for Trump's tweet storms, often having to clarify, dial back or even directly counter the president's firehose of tweets and ad-libbed asides. The measure has been blocked in United States courts. "It's not a travel ban". In fact, they arguably strengthen his argument that the executive orders are not motivated by religious bias, because they refer specifically to a "travel ban" and not a "Muslim ban". The Islamic State group has claimed responsibility for the attack.

After weeks of vowing to take the case to the Supreme Court, Trump backed away in March, issuing a revised version of the travel order that retreated from numerous controversial parts of the first version.

"No matter how the two courts rule, I predict this case will go to the Supreme Court", CNN quoted Cornell Law School professor Stephen Yale-Loehr. President Donald Trump is the first President to attack his own administration on Twitter.

Gulf rift: The Iran factor
For now, Saudi Arabia, UAE , Egypt and Bahrain are on one side, while Qatar and Iran are on the other side of the divide. They've ordered Qatari diplomats to leave in 48 hours and other Qatari nationals to pack up in two weeks.

"Its kinda odd to have the defendant in Hawaii v Trump acting as our co-counsel", Katyal tweeted.

Trump revived his call for the travel ban shortly after news broke of the weekend's terror attacks in London.

Trump needs five votes from the top court in his favor to put the ban into effect. The narrower would temporarily halt entry to the US from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

The travel ban was supposed to be a temporary measure, created to afford the administration time to conduct a review and decide what new vetting procedures were necessary.

Early this morning, apparently in response to a segment on Morning Joe, President Trump unleashed a Twitter storm about the travel ban cases, one of which has been appealed to the Supreme Court.

Were Analysts Bullish IP Group Plc (LON:IPO) This Week?
On Tuesday, May 9 the insider Schosser Douglas M sold $240,053. 161,430 shares were sold by Burke Edward J., worth $3.07M. A number of investment brokers have recently updated their price targets on shares of Stock Spirits Group (LON:STCK).

Share