Spotify removes music by "hate bands" from its platform

Share

Using a list of groups identified as racist bands by the Southern Poverty Law Center in 2014, a Digital Music News article Monday highlighted 37 such "white power" music groups that it found on the music streaming app.

The streaming firm's spokesperson added: "Spotify takes immediate action to remove any such material as soon as it has been brought to our attention. We are glad to have been alerted to this content - and have already removed numerous bands identified today, whilst urgently reviewing the remainder", she added.

"The music in our catalogue comes from hundreds of thousands of record companies and aggregators all over the world, and those are at first hand responsible for the content they deliver", a spokesperson said. Currently, if a user finds and listens to a white supremacist artist or band, Spotify will suggest more artist similar to that one, providing more potential for discovery of other hate bands. Apple responded to the report by removing the bands, but SPLC noted at the time that Spotify and Amazon were slow to do the same.

FCA joins BMW, Mobileye, and Intel's self-driving car alliance
The article also mentioned other Chinese companies as potential suitors, but said it was unclear which ones would follow through. FCA chief executive Sergio Marchionne said there would be the "synergies and economies of scale" in joining the alliance .

Shortly after the Digital Music News report was published, Spotify removed them from its app.

In the same statement, Spotify pushes a new playlist called Patriotic Passion that includes a Jimi Hendrix rendition of the Star Spangled Banner, Lady Gaga's "Americano", and Khalid's "American Teen".

"Deezer does not condone any type of discrimination or form of hate against individuals or groups due to their race, religion, gender or sexuality".

Jaguars' Bortles finds himself at a crossroad
I'll be all right". "We still have quite a bit, probably more positions open than at least what I'm used to at this time of year". Bortles threw two interceptions before that, but Marrone said that had nothing to do with the decision to rest Bortles.

A Deezer spokesperson tells the Daily News that the company is now reviewing the content on its platform and will continue to remove material "connected to any white supremacist movement or belief system".

The services features millions and millions of tracks, and bosses are now looking at the possibility of blocking such content in future.

Citizens anxious , but Seoul mum on Trump's N. Korea threat
Japanese shares rebounded on Tuesday morning, as fears of military conflict between the USA and North Korea appeared to recede. I mean, his rhetoric might make Kim Jong-un think that he needs to strike first.

Share