Cut-off date set to spend old £10 notes

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You have until March to spend your old £10 notes before they stop being accepted as legal tender.

The Bank introduced the paper £10 note featuring naturalist Charles Darwin on November 7, 2000.

The new note is made of polymer and was introduced into circulation on 14 September.

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If you still have the old tenner past this date the Bank of England, in the City of London, will swap your out-of-date paper for a crisp, new plastic £10 note featuring author Jane Austin.

The old style £5 notes went out of circulation in May, while the old round £1 coin is also no longer legal tender.

In August, the Bank of England confessed that it would continue with the use of tallow in future banknotes, the spokesperson noted that Bank "has not taken this decision lightly". Approximately 359 million paper £10 notes are estimated to still be in circulation.

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A portrait of Austen is on the back of the polymer note, accompanied by a line from her best-known work, Pride and Prejudice: "I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading!"

The new tenner is the first Bank of England note with a tactile feature to help blind and partially-sighted users.

In fact, the new note has already entered circulation in September.

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The transition to polymer has caused controversy after the Bank confirmed that an "extremely small amount" of tallow - or animal fat - was used to produce polymer pellets, which were part of the production process for creating the notes.

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