Iran says it will retaliate against 'hostile' United States sanctions

Share

President Trump announced Friday he would waive the sanctions against Iran for the "last time," giving the USA and its European partners a 120-day deadline to strengthen the deal that prohibits Iran from developing a nuclear program in exchange for entrance into worldwide commerce and banking.

The White House said on Friday that Trump will waive the sanctions against Iran for the "last time", unless an agreement can be reached between the U.S. and Europe within the next 120 days that would strengthen the nuclear deal.

In Tehran, Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif condemned Trump for "maliciously violating" the nuclear agreement.

The 2015 nuclear accord, reached after months of painstaking negotiations with the U.S., Britain, France, Germany, China and Russian Federation, lifted worldwide sanctions in exchange for Iran limiting its nuclear program.

Aides said the President will waive sanctions for the final time, Reuters reported, pointing out that if the deal is not strengthened with a follow-up agreement in 120 days, the U.S. He had previously described it as "the worst deal ever".

Trump administration unveils new sanctions on Iran
And while Trump approved a sanctions waiver, he also made a decision to impose new, targeted sanctions on Iran, the person said. The White House wants European Union signatories to agree permanent restrictions on Iran's uranium enrichment.

He was prepared to back a modification to the existing deal if it were made permanent, one official said.

Iran says its nuclear program is only for peaceful purposes. He also wants Tehran's ballistic missile program to be addressed.

President Donald Trump has extended waivers of nuclear sanctions against Iran. Washington also imposed sanctions on the head of Iran's judiciary and others.

But the official said the White House also wants Congress and European allies to take sterner action before the next deadline for extending the deal.

He also wants Congress to alter existing US laws that oversee how the federal government treats the Iran deal - but there is no sign lawmakers will do so anytime soon, or at all.

Trump says USA could 'go back in' to Paris climate agreement
The conservative prime minister had said before the meeting that she'd put climate on the agenda in the bilateral talks. This is not the first time Trump has hinted that the USA could rejoin the pact.

The findings, in a report given to the UN Security Council this week, could add weight to American and Saudi efforts to ostracise Iran with accusations that the Iranians are engaged in destabilising behaviour in the Middle East. It says it will stick to the agreement as long as the other signatories respect it but will "shred" it if Washington pulls out.

In a statement following the signing of the waivers, Trump laid out four conditions that must be met, including increased inspections, ensuring "Iran never even comes close to possessing a nuclear weapon", and that there be no expiry date to the nuke deal.

Donald Trump has announced he will not reimpose economic sanctions on Iran in a move that keeps the nuclear deal in place, despite his repeated criticism.

Analyst Richard Nephew said whether Trump's conditions could be met depended on whether he wants a face-saving way to live with the nuclear deal with the political cover of tough-sounding U.S. legislation, or whether he really wants the deal rewritten.

The Most Intriguing NBA Rookies
So far he’s performing as expected, notching impressive rebounding and blocking numbers in heavy Summer League minutes. It’s undeniable at this point that this rookie class is going to generate a lot of attention for a long time to come.

Share