Home Office 'failed to foresee policy's bad Windrush effects'

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David Lammy has written to Theresa May with 10 questions for the Government to answer over the Windrush scandal.

Thousands of people who have lived and worked in the United Kingdom for decades have been harassed by the government.

David Wood, the deputy chief executive of the UK Border Agency for almost five years until 2013, said the consequences for Windrush immigrants had not been foreseen.

"These policies have been shown to be not only morally reprehensible but have created an environment where numerous Windrush generation continue to be subjected to unlawful treatment".

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Home Secretary Amber Rudd should "consider her position" over the "misery" caused to Windrush migrants, Labour's shadow home secretary says.

The Home Office has confirmed 113 cases are now being investigated, but ministers have insisted they are yet to find evidence to confirm reports that some have been wrongly deported.

Ms Abbott said the criteria used by the Home Office to establish continued residency was "arbitrary" and officials should be allowed to use their own discretion to decide on cases.

She also called on the Home Office to do more, saying the department should be contacting hospitals to make sure no one from the Windrush generation was being denied treatment and reviewing all cases of deportation to Caribbean Commonwealth countries of those aged over 40.

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The Home Office says the cards were not definitive proof of continuous residence in the United Kingdom - it says things like employment and school records were a more reliable method.

Conservative Culture Secretary Matthew Hancock told Sky News the decision to destroy the documents was taken by officials at the UK Border Agency, which was independent at the time, and had since been brought under direct Home Office control.

The Labour MP has called on the Prime Minister to set out how the children of the Windrush generation - a term for people from the Caribbean countries who arrived in Britain between 1948 and 1971 - will be compensated "for the suffering they have endured at the hands of her Government that has treated them in such a cruel and inhumane manner".

Speaking about the database destruction, Sir Bob Kerslake, the former head of the civil service, said some government ministers described May's tenure at the Home Office as being "almost reminiscent of Nazi Germany".

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