Ruet-e-Hilal committee to meet on June 14 for Shawwal moon

Share

If the moon is sighted in any part of the Indian subcontinent, all Muslims in the region celebrate Eid ul-Fitr with fervour the next day.

As for the public sector, government ministries and departments will be closed from Thursday, resuming work on either Monday or Tuesday, depending on moon sightings.

The ministry's circular means private sector workers with a Friday/Saturday weekend could potentially receive no extra days off.

White House Pays People To Tape Documents Trump Rips Apart
While this hardly ranks high on the list of this President's violations of our norms and laws, it's among the most freakish . Lartey said he saw everything from invitations to a letter to Trump from Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.).

The Islamic holy month of fasting is the first and only day in the month of Shawwal during which Muslims are not permitted to fast.

Pupils are likely to return to school on Monday, but it will be subject to an announcement from the government, according to the Knowledge and Human Development Authority.

Mr Dambazau also urged all Nigerians, irrespective of their religion, to use the occasion of the celebration to pray for the peace, unity, prosperity and stability of the nation.

NCAA announces transfer, redshirt rule changes
Golfers, tennis players and other athletes in traditionally nonrevenue sports can transfer one time without sitting out. Tampering by schools in transfer situations has been upgraded to a potential Level 2 violations, per the NCAA.

This year, Eid ul-Fitr in India is expected to begin on the evening of June 14, Thursday and end on the evening of June 15, Friday. This month's new moon falls on June 13 at 19:43 UTC (Coordinated Universal Time). Ramadan always lasts between 29 and 30 days.

The market will resume trading on Wednesday, June 20, an official spokesman of the bourse said.

Meghan Markle has just announced an exciting new job
Once everyone arrived, the family gathered together on the balcony to observe the iconic fly-past by the Royal Air Force. According to royal expert and Majesty magazine managing editor Joe Little , there's an etiquette to these things.

Share