The end of net neutrality is here

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Ellis SchumerDem leaders condemn Trump after reversal on G-7 communique endorsement Dem lawmaker: Trump conceding "role as leader of the free world" after G-7 summit Schumer: Trump "turning our foreign policy into an global joke" MORE (D-N.Y) is blaming congressional Republicans for the repeal of the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) net neutrality rules, a shift which goes into effect Monday.

The Federal Communications Commission's rules preventing Internet service providers from blocking or slowing legal traffic, or charging for faster delivery of some content, passed with much fanfare in 2015, are history as of Monday.

Net neutrality protections, first put in place during the Obama administration, will end on June 11.

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FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel - who voted against the repeal of Net Neutrality - released her own statement today. Telecoms are now free to block, slow, or otherwise discriminate against online content and services.

The federal government starts rolling back net neutrality rules today. Under a new plan, the Federal Trade Commission will police the ISPs. In other words, net neutrality is dead, folks.

But, in December, the FCC voted to repeal the rules.

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"In the House, we'll need 218 lawmakers to sign on to a "discharge petition" in order to force a vote past leadership to the floor", the coalition's website outlines. "Under that approach, the Internet was open and free", he wrote. Those on the political left (and about 83 percent of Americans) feel that net neutrality regulations were important for personal freedom and made for a more fair marketplace. "And in the medium- to long-term, I think we're going to see more investment in high-speed networks, particularly in rural areas that are hard to serve". "But then in 2015, the FCC chose a different course".

Pai also called the new course of action a "tremendous bipartisan success" and noted that the rules were "especially harmful for smaller internet service providers who didn't have the means to withstand a regulatory onslaught".

The U.S. open internet rules expired on Monday, handing sweeping new powers to internet providers to block, throttle or offer paid "fast lanes" for web traffic, but a court battle remains ahead.

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The FTC would theoretically file lawsuits against ISPs that make net neutrality promises and then break them. According to the National Council of State Legislatures, governors in six states - New Jersey, New York, Montana, Rhode Island, Vermont and Hawaii - have signed executive orders upholding net neutrality, and three - Washington, Vermont and OR - have enacted legislation that does so.

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