Volkswagen fined $1.5-billion by German authorities over diesel scandal

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The scandal, which came to light in the United States in 2015, has already cost the German automaker US$20 billion ($26 billion Canadian) in fines and civil settlements in the U.S.

Ziehe said the fine was "painful", adding it's the highest amount of money to be ever fined against a German company.

Germany will allow interest groups to sue on behalf of consumers, taking a tentative step toward US -style class-action lawsuits in a bid to make it easier to collect damages from big companies in the aftermath of Volkswagen AG's diesel-cheating scandal.

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The prosecutor's office in Braunschweig ordered the fine against the carmaker for organisational deficiencies in supervision which failed to prevent "impermissible software functions" from being installed in 10.7 million cars between 2007 and 2015.

The company says it doesn't plan to file an appeal; the company has admitted fault in the so-called "dieselgate" scandal.

These are the current CEO, Herbert Diess, supervisory board chairman Hans Dieter Pötsch and former CEO Martin Winterkorn. He's accused of fraud and false advertising, according to the publication. "Volkswagen, by doing so, admits its responsibility for the diesel crisis".

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The German fine follows fines in the USA from a plea agreement in January 2017. Those breaches of supervision meant nearly 11 million diesel cars were fitted with emissions-cheating software.

Martin Winterkorn, the former chief executive officer of Volkswagen, was indicted last month by USA prosecutors.

The scandal dubbed "dieselgate" has so far cost the world's largest carmaker more than 25 billion euros in buybacks, fines and compensation, and the company remains mired in legal woes at home and overseas.

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Three others are being investigated for market manipulation for concealing information about the cheating from the public.

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