May 'wobbling' after ministers 'run away': How Europe sees Brexit drama

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He said "the Brexit dream is dying, suffocated by needless self doubt".

But all eyes are on Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, who backed the proposals at Chequers, despite claiming that defending the plans was like "polishing a turd" during the meeting.

Their resignation prompted a mini-reshuffle, with former health secretary Jeremy Hunt stepping into Mr Johnson's shoes and former housing minister Dominic Raab taking over from Mr Davis.

But despite all that, former Brexit minister David Davis didn't use his resignation letter on Sunday to secretly tell the nation: "It's coming home".

"Perhaps, one side effect of my departure might be to put a little pressure on the government not to make any other concessions and I will keep arguing to say there is a better way to do it than this", Davis said.

His resignation comes just a month after he was heard launching a scathing attack on the government's Brexit strategy in a leaked tape from a private dinner with Conservative activists.

Downing Street made clear the PM would fight any attempt to oust her by rebel MPs.

Leaving the gathering, leading Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg said he did not think there would be a confidence vote over Mrs May.

Maasikas, who is the Estonian Deputy Minister for EU Affairs and also sits on the EU General Affairs Council, said the Brexit talks will once again be discussed on 20 July.

Johnson, who favours a stronger break with the European Union, said in his resignation letter that Britain is "truly headed for the status of [EU] colony". He said Britain was heading for a "semi-Brexit".

On Friday, her cabinet ostensibly agreed to pursue a close post-Brexit trading relationship with the EU.

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There have been differences within the Conservatives over how far the United Kingdom should prioritise the economy by compromising on issues such as leaving the remit of the European Court of Justice and ending free movement of people.

Two years after Britain voted 52 percent to 48 percent to leave the European Union, May is trying to find a middle way between two starkly differing views -within her party and the country - of the UK's relationship with Europe.

An agreement was announced after the 12-hour meeting, but many Brexiteers have been unhappy with the deal which they think will lead to the "worst of both worlds".

David Davis' decision to resign from the cabinet has left the government in chaos.

He told BBC Radio 4's Today: "It seems to me we are giving too much away too easily and that's a risky strategy at this time".

The Suddeutsche Zeitung says Davis and Johnson "ran away" from May, who it says is now in the "most hard crisis" of her time in Downing Street.

Prime Minister Theresa May has defended her Brexit plans. Her spokesman said the cabinet had discussed the publication of a "white paper" policy document on Britain's future ties with the European Union and stepping up preparations for any no-deal outcome to the negotiations with Brussels.

If Davis' resignation rattled May, Johnson's shook the foundations of her government.

Defence Minister Guto Bebb told BBC Radio Cymru he did not think there would be a leadership challenge soon.

Mrs May told MPs that the plan agreed by the cabinet at Chequers was the basis of a "responsible and credible" offer to restart renegotiations with the EU.

Under her proposal, a treaty would be signed committing the UK to "continued harmonisation" with EU rules - avoiding friction at the UK-EU border, including Northern Ireland. Baker was replaced by Chris Heaton-Harris, another Brexiter, who sparked controversy a year ago after asking universities to supply details of their teaching on the EU.

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